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Only through art can we emerge from ourselves and know what another person sees.

21. étrangère.
Art. Architecture. Literature. Film.

Student of Art History and Visual Culture in Paris, France
thusreluctant:

French Tea Garden by Childe Hassam

thusreluctant:

French Tea Garden by Childe Hassam

(Source: the-athenaeum.org)

3 days ago
51 notes
artexpert:

Chestnut tree in bloom (1881) - Pierre-Auguste Renoir

artexpert:

Chestnut tree in bloom (1881) - Pierre-Auguste Renoir

3 days ago
78 notes
Warhol portrait of Robert Rauschenberg, location: Andrea Caratsch’s gallery in Zurich. Made in 1962.
Perhaps, this is, the earliest portrait of a living sitter in Warhol’s mature career, and one of his very earliest silkscreens. (not count his movie-star images as portraits). That means this work is a first experiment in the genre that filled the final two-thirds of Warhol’s career.
The 1962 portrait features one of the cutting-edge artists that Warhol was most keen on emulating, and whose friendship he had only just managed to win. Average museumgoers, and even experts, don’t always realize how deeply committed Warhol was to the classic, egghead avant-garde, and how deeply immersed he was in it at this point in his career; this portrait stands as his declaration of that commitment. It also comes at just the moment when Warhol was able to turn the tables on Rauschenberg, by offering to help his elder learn the new photo-silkscreen technique. (Although the tale’s also told that Rauschenberg taught him.)
Rauschenberg was also some kind of model for Warhol of what it was to be a successful gay artist, even if he had once rejected Warhol as too “swish” for his tastes. I think you can read Rauschenberg’s un-swish-ness from the way Warhol depicts him here, in an image that has none of the camp playfulness of Warhol’s Pop works from this era. Drowning in a deep-blue sea, Rauschenberg has stronger echoes in this portrait of his own Black Paintings, or of Warhol’s later “Disasters,” than of Warhol’s “Troy Donohue” or “Marilyn” silkscreens. You could almost read this dour, barely-there portrait as being in mourning for, or at least a token of, Rauschenberg’s closeted life. With its figure small and lost, gazing up into the heavens, this is one of the most wistful images Warhol ever made. All that blackness, and the filmic stutters running down the surface of the work, remind me most of Warhol’s dark and cryptic “Shadow” silkscreens from 1978.


- via Blouin artinfo & Blake Gopnik

Warhol portrait of Robert Rauschenberg, location: Andrea Caratsch’s gallery in Zurich. Made in 1962.

Perhaps, this is, the earliest portrait of a living sitter in Warhol’s mature career, and one of his very earliest silkscreens. (not count his movie-star images as portraits). That means this work is a first experiment in the genre that filled the final two-thirds of Warhol’s career.

The 1962 portrait features one of the cutting-edge artists that Warhol was most keen on emulating, and whose friendship he had only just managed to win. Average museumgoers, and even experts, don’t always realize how deeply committed Warhol was to the classic, egghead avant-garde, and how deeply immersed he was in it at this point in his career; this portrait stands as his declaration of that commitment. It also comes at just the moment when Warhol was able to turn the tables on Rauschenberg, by offering to help his elder learn the new photo-silkscreen technique. (Although the tale’s also told that Rauschenberg taught him.)

Rauschenberg was also some kind of model for Warhol of what it was to be a successful gay artist, even if he had once rejected Warhol as too “swish” for his tastes. I think you can read Rauschenberg’s un-swish-ness from the way Warhol depicts him here, in an image that has none of the camp playfulness of Warhol’s Pop works from this era. Drowning in a deep-blue sea, Rauschenberg has stronger echoes in this portrait of his own Black Paintings, or of Warhol’s later “Disasters,” than of Warhol’s “Troy Donohue” or “Marilyn” silkscreens. You could almost read this dour, barely-there portrait as being in mourning for, or at least a token of, Rauschenberg’s closeted life. With its figure small and lost, gazing up into the heavens, this is one of the most wistful images Warhol ever made. All that blackness, and the filmic stutters running down the surface of the work, remind me most of Warhol’s dark and cryptic “Shadow” silkscreens from 1978.

- via Blouin artinfo & Blake Gopnik

3 days ago
1 note
chimneyfish:

Nymphs (Silver Fish), 1899
Gustav Klimt

chimneyfish:

Nymphs (Silver Fish), 1899

Gustav Klimt

(via tierradentro)

4 days ago
482 notes
hyperallergic:

(via Amid Destruction, US Institutions Hold Syria Museums Workshop in Undisclosed Location)
As cultural and artistic heritage in Syria continues to face significant losses, two United States institutions have partnered with the Syrian Interim Government’s “Heritage Task Force” to share strategies for mitigating the dangers faced by museums and other sites.
READ MORE

hyperallergic:

(via Amid Destruction, US Institutions Hold Syria Museums Workshop in Undisclosed Location)

As cultural and artistic heritage in Syria continues to face significant losses, two United States institutions have partnered with the Syrian Interim Government’s “Heritage Task Force” to share strategies for mitigating the dangers faced by museums and other sites.

READ MORE

4 days ago
15 notes
im-not-mine:

Hugues Merle, Mary Magdalene in the Cave, 1868.

im-not-mine:

Hugues Merle, Mary Magdalene in the Cave, 1868.

(via mothersmourningdress)

4 days ago
149 notes
hismarmorealcalm:

Caryatids from the Acropolis being restored at Athens Museum

hismarmorealcalm:

Caryatids from the Acropolis being restored at Athens Museum

(via centuriespast)

4 days ago
363 notes
vcrfl:

Camille Corot: Diana and Actaeon, 1836.

Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY, NY

vcrfl:

Camille Corot: Diana and Actaeon, 1836.

Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY, NY

1 week ago
1,058 notes
artmastered:

Claude Monet, On the Boat, 1887, oil on canvas, 145.5 x 133.5 cm, The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo.

artmastered:

Claude Monet, On the Boat, 1887, oil on canvas, 145.5 x 133.5 cm, The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo.

3 days ago
318 notes
femalebeautyinart:

A Woman in Blue (Portrait of the Duchess of Beaufort) by Thomas Gainsborough, late 1770s-early 1780s

femalebeautyinart:

A Woman in Blue (Portrait of the Duchess of Beaufort) by Thomas Gainsborough, late 1770s-early 1780s

3 days ago
3 notes
http://theartnewspaper.com/articles/How-much-are-curators-really-paid/33307

Many in the art world were staggered by recent reports that the Italian curator Germano Celant is being paid €750,000 to organise a pavilion for the Milan Expo 2015. Celant’s fee, and the incredulity it provoked, raises questions about how much curators are typically paid for organising biennials and large-scale international exhibitions.

The Art Newspaper surveyed around 40 international curators and biennial organisers; our research shows that biennials usually pay their top curators less than one-sixth of Celant’s total fee. 

3 days ago
0 notes
fleurdulys:

Minerva Dressing - Lavinia Fontana
~1613

fleurdulys:

Minerva Dressing - Lavinia Fontana

~1613

4 days ago
64 notes
magictransistor:

Hannah Höch, Die Treppe (The Staircase), oil on canvas, c. 1926.

magictransistor:

Hannah Höch, Die Treppe (The Staircase), oil on canvas, c. 1926.

4 days ago
118 notes
labellefilleart:

 Gathering Mushrooms in the Forest, Sergei Arsenevich Vinogradov

labellefilleart:

 Gathering Mushrooms in the Forest, Sergei Arsenevich Vinogradov

4 days ago
80 notes
Vincent Van Gogh used to eat yellow paint because he thought it would get the happiness inside him. Many people thought he was mad and stupid for doing so because the paint was toxic, never mind that it was obvious that eating paint couldn’t possible have any direct correlation to one’s happiness, but I never saw that. If you were so unhappy that even the maddest ideas could possible work, like painting the walls of your internal organs yellow, than you are going to do it. It’s really no different than falling in love or taking drugs. There is a greater risk of getting your heart broken or overdosing, but people still do it everyday because there was always that chance it could make things better. Everyone has their yellow paint.

"Everyone has their yellow paint"

(via dlserenity)

(Source: cunt-punching, via theguywhoinventedtheseatbelt)

4 days ago
2,861 notes