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Only through art can we emerge from ourselves and know what another person sees.

21. étrangère.
Art. Architecture. Literature. Film.

Student of Art History and Visual Culture in Paris, France
chimneyfish:


Female Nude from the Back, 1905
Max Slevogt

chimneyfish:

Female Nude from the Back, 1905

Max Slevogt

3 hours ago
394 notes
labellefilleart:

Two Women on the Hillside, Sketch, Franz Marc 
 

labellefilleart:

Two Women on the Hillside, Sketch, Franz Marc 

 
3 hours ago
540 notes

Fact:

funartfacts:

Adolf Hitler was rejected from the Vienna Akademie der Bildenden Künste in 1907.  In 1906 Austrian artist Egon Schiele had entered the school, with the rejection of Hitler it is commonly believed that Schiele and Hitler knew each other, however, there is no evidence to prove that they met or knew each other at that time.

3 hours ago
4 notes
gandalf1202:

Nicolas Poussin - Santa Francesca Romana [c.1657] on Flickr.
[Musée du Louvre, Paris - Oil on canvas, 130 x 101 cm]

gandalf1202:

Nicolas Poussin - Santa Francesca Romana [c.1657] on Flickr.

[Musée du Louvre, Paris - Oil on canvas, 130 x 101 cm]

3 days ago
126 notes
And Here’s Another New Contemporary Art Museum | Real Clear Arts | ARTINFO.com

On Cape Town’s waterfront at the southern tip of Africa, the world’s biggest museum of contemporary art from across the continent is being carved from a conglomeration of concrete tubes nine storeys high.

The $50 million (36.7 million euro) project to transform the grim functionality of 42 disused colonial grain silos into an ultramodern tribute to African creativity is driven by an international team of art experts and architects.

3 days ago
0 notes
artmastered:

Claude Monet, On the Boat, 1887, oil on canvas, 145.5 x 133.5 cm, The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo.

artmastered:

Claude Monet, On the Boat, 1887, oil on canvas, 145.5 x 133.5 cm, The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo.

1 week ago
354 notes
femalebeautyinart:

A Woman in Blue (Portrait of the Duchess of Beaufort) by Thomas Gainsborough, late 1770s-early 1780s

femalebeautyinart:

A Woman in Blue (Portrait of the Duchess of Beaufort) by Thomas Gainsborough, late 1770s-early 1780s

1 week ago
3 notes
http://theartnewspaper.com/articles/How-much-are-curators-really-paid/33307

Many in the art world were staggered by recent reports that the Italian curator Germano Celant is being paid €750,000 to organise a pavilion for the Milan Expo 2015. Celant’s fee, and the incredulity it provoked, raises questions about how much curators are typically paid for organising biennials and large-scale international exhibitions.

The Art Newspaper surveyed around 40 international curators and biennial organisers; our research shows that biennials usually pay their top curators less than one-sixth of Celant’s total fee. 

1 week ago
0 notes
Das Wunderkind, 1874, Gabriel von Hackl

Das Wunderkind, 1874, Gabriel von Hackl

3 hours ago
0 notes

cosmic-flavor:

This is Hundertwasser Haus. It is located in the 3rd district in the Löwengasse, Vienna.

3 hours ago
446 notes
More museums skip admission
14 hours ago
0 notes
Colours in painting are like verses in poetry: they are the charms that each of the two arts employs to persuade.
Nicolas Poussin (via itsquoted)
3 days ago
56 notes
thusreluctant:

French Tea Garden by Childe Hassam

thusreluctant:

French Tea Garden by Childe Hassam

(Source: the-athenaeum.org)

1 week ago
51 notes
artexpert:

Chestnut tree in bloom (1881) - Pierre-Auguste Renoir

artexpert:

Chestnut tree in bloom (1881) - Pierre-Auguste Renoir

1 week ago
121 notes
Warhol portrait of Robert Rauschenberg, location: Andrea Caratsch’s gallery in Zurich. Made in 1962.
Perhaps, this is, the earliest portrait of a living sitter in Warhol’s mature career, and one of his very earliest silkscreens. (not count his movie-star images as portraits). That means this work is a first experiment in the genre that filled the final two-thirds of Warhol’s career.
The 1962 portrait features one of the cutting-edge artists that Warhol was most keen on emulating, and whose friendship he had only just managed to win. Average museumgoers, and even experts, don’t always realize how deeply committed Warhol was to the classic, egghead avant-garde, and how deeply immersed he was in it at this point in his career; this portrait stands as his declaration of that commitment. It also comes at just the moment when Warhol was able to turn the tables on Rauschenberg, by offering to help his elder learn the new photo-silkscreen technique. (Although the tale’s also told that Rauschenberg taught him.)
Rauschenberg was also some kind of model for Warhol of what it was to be a successful gay artist, even if he had once rejected Warhol as too “swish” for his tastes. I think you can read Rauschenberg’s un-swish-ness from the way Warhol depicts him here, in an image that has none of the camp playfulness of Warhol’s Pop works from this era. Drowning in a deep-blue sea, Rauschenberg has stronger echoes in this portrait of his own Black Paintings, or of Warhol’s later “Disasters,” than of Warhol’s “Troy Donohue” or “Marilyn” silkscreens. You could almost read this dour, barely-there portrait as being in mourning for, or at least a token of, Rauschenberg’s closeted life. With its figure small and lost, gazing up into the heavens, this is one of the most wistful images Warhol ever made. All that blackness, and the filmic stutters running down the surface of the work, remind me most of Warhol’s dark and cryptic “Shadow” silkscreens from 1978.


- via Blouin artinfo & Blake Gopnik

Warhol portrait of Robert Rauschenberg, location: Andrea Caratsch’s gallery in Zurich. Made in 1962.

Perhaps, this is, the earliest portrait of a living sitter in Warhol’s mature career, and one of his very earliest silkscreens. (not count his movie-star images as portraits). That means this work is a first experiment in the genre that filled the final two-thirds of Warhol’s career.

The 1962 portrait features one of the cutting-edge artists that Warhol was most keen on emulating, and whose friendship he had only just managed to win. Average museumgoers, and even experts, don’t always realize how deeply committed Warhol was to the classic, egghead avant-garde, and how deeply immersed he was in it at this point in his career; this portrait stands as his declaration of that commitment. It also comes at just the moment when Warhol was able to turn the tables on Rauschenberg, by offering to help his elder learn the new photo-silkscreen technique. (Although the tale’s also told that Rauschenberg taught him.)

Rauschenberg was also some kind of model for Warhol of what it was to be a successful gay artist, even if he had once rejected Warhol as too “swish” for his tastes. I think you can read Rauschenberg’s un-swish-ness from the way Warhol depicts him here, in an image that has none of the camp playfulness of Warhol’s Pop works from this era. Drowning in a deep-blue sea, Rauschenberg has stronger echoes in this portrait of his own Black Paintings, or of Warhol’s later “Disasters,” than of Warhol’s “Troy Donohue” or “Marilyn” silkscreens. You could almost read this dour, barely-there portrait as being in mourning for, or at least a token of, Rauschenberg’s closeted life. With its figure small and lost, gazing up into the heavens, this is one of the most wistful images Warhol ever made. All that blackness, and the filmic stutters running down the surface of the work, remind me most of Warhol’s dark and cryptic “Shadow” silkscreens from 1978.

- via Blouin artinfo & Blake Gopnik

1 week ago
1 note