Only through art can we emerge from ourselves and know what another person sees.

21. étrangère.
Art. Architecture. Literature. Film.

Student of Art History and Visual Culture in Paris, France
  • Fact:

    funartfacts:

    The current remains of the Athenian Parthenon, are actually remains of the second Parthenon. Before 447 BCE, there was another smaller Parthenon. Unfortunately, this building was sacked and burned to the ground during the Persian attacks of 480 BCE. The Athenians built the new larger Parthenon on the same spot as the previous one. Interestingly, they buried the previous statues yet, reused certain materials for the construction of the new building.

  • laclefdescoeurs:

    Les trois baigneuses, 1872-73, Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot

    (via post-impressionisms)

  • art-and-fury:

    Model By The Wicker Chair - Edvard Munch

    (previous)

    (via post-impressionisms)

  • zombienormal:

    Russian Ballet, Walter Schnackenberg, Die Kunst für Alle, 1912-13

    (via mothersmourningdress)

  • minoancorner:

    Papyrus fresco. 17th century BC. Akrotiri, Thera.

    Currently in the Museum of Prehistoric Thera, Santorini.

    (x)

  • Linear B is one of the earliest known Greek languages, two forms of language were found Linear A and Linear B in Mycenae.  Currently only Linear B has been translated and predates the Greek alphabet by several centuries.

    (Source: rowanluis)

  • Roland Barthes (via linguisticious)
  • "Language is a skin: I rub my language against the other. It is as if I had words instead of fingers, or fingers at the tip of my words. My language trembles with desire."
  • magictransistor:

    Gustave Doré, Charles Perrault’s fairytales [Illustrations de Les Contes de Perrault]; Peau-d’âne (Donkeyskin), c. 1867.

  • transistoradio:

    John Zinsser (b.1961), File Study: “Should I Try Heroin?” (Beuys) (2014), collage, graphite, and oil paint on card stock, 15 x 9.5 inches. Via 1stdibs.

  • fleurdulys:

    Three Dancers - Suzanne Valadon

    1916

  • gacougnol:

    André Breton et Suzanne Muzard rue Fontaine
    ca. 1929
    Unknown Author

    (via germanview)